1

Old Wan Chai Post station

In the 1950s and 1960s, it was said that there was a ghost postman at the Wan Chai Post Office. He looked like an ordinary postman, but he only delivered a blank letter after midnight. Households who received the blank letter would have one of the family members dead within seven days, and that piece of paper would disappear strangely!

Address: 221 Queen's Road East, Wan Chai
2

Old Wan Chai Market

Legend has it that the rooftop playground in the Wan Chai Market was set up for children who were killed by the Japanese army. It is hoped that their souls could have a shelter so that they would not come out to harass the residents. However, some people said that it is actually designed for the little masters who is travelling with the domestic servants in the old days, so that they could play there while waiting to return home.

Address: Queen's Road East, Wan Chai
3

Nam Koo Terrace

Nam Koo Terrace, commonly known as the "Wan Chai Haunted House", was a VIP room used as a comfort station during the Japanese occupation. Over the years, there were many rumours about the haunting of Nam Koo Terrace, such as green flames and strange lights floating in the house in the middle of the night, and also noises of women screaming.

Address: 55 Ship Street, Wan Chai
4

Southorn Playground

Southorn Stadium, opened in 1934, is the main landmark of Wan Chai in the past. During the Japanese occupation of Hong Kong, this was actually a shooting range for the Japanese soldiers. The dead bodies were piled up like a mountain, and they were even piled up on Johnston Road outside the stadium. So Southorn Stadium is also known as Ghost Stadium.

Address: 130-150 Hennessy Road, Wan Chai
5

Bowrington Villain Hitting

The traditional custom of "beating the villain" is mainly carried out on 5 March, which is the "Jingzhe" in the 24 solar terms. The hot spot for playing villain must be the bottom of the Gooseneck Bridge. In recent years, the "polular" villains are still bosses, colleagues and mistresses. The price of the villain service is fairly reasonable.

Address: 1 Canal Road East, Bowrington
6

Pak Kung Temple

According to the legend, Pak Kung was originally a Chinese medicine practitioner working in a stairwell of Elgin Street in the Central. He often gave away medicine to the poor villagers. After he passed away on 15 August in a certain year, in order to commemorate him, the neighbourhood built a temple at the entrance of his stairs. In 1967, the building was demolished and moved to the current site.

Address: 41 Staunton Street, Central

Overview

1

Old Wan Chai Post station

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  • Walk 1 mins

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2

Old Wan Chai Market

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  • Walk 7 mins

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3

Nam Koo Terrace

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  • Walk 5 mins

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4

Southorn Playground

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  • Walk 13 mins

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5

Bowrington Villain Hitting

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  • Walk 49 mins

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6

Pak Kung Temple